Increasing the number of patients receiving information about transition to end-of-life care

Martinsson, L. et al. (2016) BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 6(4) pp. 452-458

B0005925 Teaching

Image source: Rowena Dugdale – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Introduction: Honest prognostication and information for patients are important parts of end-of-life care. This study examined whether an educational intervention could increase the proportion of patients who received information about the transition to end-of-life (ITEOL care).

Method: Two municipalities (in charge of nursing homes) and two hospitals were randomised to receive an interactive half-day course about ITEOL for physicians and nurses. The proportion of patients who received ITEOL was measured with data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care (SRPC). Patients were only included if they died an expected death and maintained their ability to express their will until days or hours before their death. Four hospitals and four municipalities were assigned controls, matched by hospital size, population and proportion of patients receiving ITEOL at baseline.

Results:The proportion of patients in the intervention group who received ITEOL increased from 35.1% (during a 6-month period before the intervention) to 42% (during a 6-month period after the intervention). The proportion in the control group increased from 30.4% to 33.7%. The effect of the intervention was significant (p=0.005) in a multivariable model adjusted for time, age, gender and cause of death.

Conclusion: More patients at end-of-life received ITEOL after an educative half-day intervention directed to physicians and nurses.

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