The state of hospice services in England 2014 to 2017

The state of hospice services in England 2014 to 2017 presents findings from the Care Quality Commission’s programme of inspections.

The CQC inspected hospice services in England between October 2014 and January 2017.

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Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The results found that Hospice care across England has the highest percentage of health and social care services that are rated outstanding (25%), and a further 70% are rated good.

The inspections found that hospice leaders and frontline staff displayed a strong commitment to providing truly person-centred, compassionate care and support to people using their services, and their loved ones. They also developed strong relationships with other services in the area.

However, the report makes the case that there is more to be done to make sure that everyone, regardless of their background or circumstances, can access high-quality end of life care. Hospice services rated as outstanding were striving to overcome such inequalities and share their expertise to drive better care in other services.

Full report: The state of hospice services in England 2014 to 2017. Findings from CQC’s initial programme of comprehensive inspections of hospice services 

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Talking about death

Age UK and the malnutrition taskforce have published a booklet and accompanying animation designed to help people have positive conversations about death with the people they care about.

Lets talk about death: How to have difficult conversations

 

Lesley Carter, Programme Head of Malnutrition Taskforce and Head of Health Influencing at Age UK said: ‘We know that having the confidence to start a conversation about dying and death is very hard, we struggle to find the right time, the right words and we are terrified of upsetting the other person and ourselves.

‘We have written this bright well-illustrated book and film that can be used to explore this issue with children, adults and professionals. We’ve explained why it is important to talk about dying and death, given ideas of how you could start a conversation, what you may want to say. Obviously, we are all different, you will find your own words. We hope that these resources will give you the confidence to give it a go.’

The booklet is available to download here

Family visits in care homes

Bruce Walmsley & Lynne McCormack | Severe dementia: relational social engagement (RSE) during family visits | Aging & Mental Health Vol. 21 , Iss. 12,2017

Abstract:

Objective: Few studies have utilised observation to investigate retained awareness when individuals with severe dementia interact with family members. Seeking evidence of retained awareness in those with severe dementia, interactive family visits in care homes were observed and analysed.

Method: Five family groups (14 individuals) completed 10/15-minute video recorded family interactions. Speech and non-speech interactions were analysed using Thematic Analysis.

Results: One superordinate theme: Distinctive family bonds; overarched two subthemes, in-step and out-of-step describing positive and negative familial interactions. In-step interactions revealed family groups reciprocating social support, having fun together, and willing to go on the ride together. Out-of-step interactions characterised social frustration, non-reciprocity, and sidelining of members with dementia. Although awareness fluctuated, complex awareness was observed in the speech/non-speech expressions of those with dementia. In response, visitors appeared to treat those expressions and behaviours as understandable. Observed outcomes were out-of-step when visitors sought to retain the familiar and in-step when visitors sought to optimise all communication possibilities.

Conclusion: Video recorded family interactions and analysis revealed: (a) awareness was retained in the participants with severe dementia beyond assessed levels; and (b) Relational Social Engagement (RSE) occurred within family groups despite positive or negative interactions. Implications are discussed.

Choice in end of life care

How the National End of Life Care Programme Board is delivering personalisation and choice in care for people at or near the end of life. | Department of Health

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This report sets out the progress the National End of Life Care Programme Board has made in implementing the government’s choice commitment.

The measures include:

  • supporting the roll-out of digital palliative and end of life care records to all areas by 2020
  • inspecting and rating NHS hospital and community services for end of life care
  • providing support to trusts to help them improve end of life care services
  • testing personal health budgets for people approaching the end of life to give them choice and control over their care
  • developing metrics to assess quality and experience in end of life care
  • working to change the nursing and medical undergraduate and postgraduate curricula to improve patient choice and quality of care

Full report: One Year On: The Government Response to the Review of Choice in End of Life Care

Continuation of non-essential medications in actively dying hospitalised patients

The objective of this analysis was to examine the use of 11 non-essential medications in actively dying patients | BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care

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This was a planned secondary analysis of data from the Best Practices for End-of-Life Care for Our Nation’s Veterans trial, a multicentre implementation trial of an intervention to improve processes of end-of-life care in inpatient settings. Supported with an electronic comfort care decision support tool, intervention included training hospital staff to identify actively dying patients, communicate the prognosis to patients/families and implement best practices of traditionally home-based hospice care. Data on medication use before and after intervention were derived from electronic medical records of 5476 deceased veterans.

Non-essential medications continue to be administered to actively dying patients. Discontinuation of these medications may be facilitated by interventions that enhance recognition and consideration of patients’ actively dying status.

Full reference: Williams, B.R., et al. (2017) Continuation of non-essential medications in actively dying hospitalised patients. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. Published Online First: 13 September 2017.

Death and dying in the UK

Death, dying and devolution | The University of Bath Institute for Policy Research

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The articles in this collection cover what happens before someone dies, including issues around palliative care and support for carers; what happens at death, including issues around the proper regulation of funerals and public financial support for the bereaved; and what happens to those who are left behind, including emotional support for those who have been bereaved and issues around managing the estates of those who have died.

The report reviews policy areas associated with death, dying and bereavement within the context of devolution. It focuses on the national and regional delegation of power, resources and authority across the UK and the implications of this for those who are dying, dead, or bereaved as well as those tasked with organising and running the services that support these groups of people.

The report can be downloaded here

What are families most grateful for after receiving palliative care?

Family members are involved in the care of palliative patients at home and therefore, should be viewed as important sources of information to help clinicians better understand the quality palliative care service patients receive | BMC Palliative Care

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Image source: Ricardo Díaz – Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Qualitative exploratory study based on documentary analysis. Content analysis of 77 gratitude documents received over 8 years by a palliative home service in Odivelas, near Lisbon (Portugal) was undertaken, through an inductive approach and using investigator triangulation. Frequency of distinct categories was quantitatively defined.

Family carers show spontaneous gratitude for the professionalism and humanity found in palliative care. The relational component of care emerges as key to achieve a high quality care experience of palliative care homes service, and could be one indicator of quality of palliative care.

Full reference: Aparicio, M. et al. (2017) What are families most grateful for after receiving palliative care? Content analysis of written documents received: a chance to improve the quality of care. BMC Palliative Care. Published: 6 September 2017