Developing a model for embedded palliative care in a cancer clinic

Describe the development and key features of a model for embedded palliative care (PC) for patients with advanced kidney cancer or melanoma seen in a cancer clinic | BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care

Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients following an initial phase and then a prospective review following the implementation of a model for embedded PC.

Results: In the initial phase, 18 patients were seen for a total of 53 visits; 78% were seen more than once, with a mean of three visits per patient. In the model phase, 46 patients were seen for a total of 163 visits; 74% were seen more than once, with a mean of 3.5 visits. Demographics were similar between the two groups. Content of the first PC visit in the initial and model phases was symptom management (61% and 57%), psychosocial support/relationship building (28% and 35%) and advance care planning/decision-making support (11% and 8%), respectively.

Conclusions: The initial phase demonstrated acceptability and feasibility of a model for embedded PC for patients and the oncology team. Establishment of specific eligibility criteria and screening to identify eligible patients in the model phase led to an increased uptake of PC for patients with advanced kidney cancer and melanoma in a cancer clinic.

Full reference: DeSanto-Madeya, S. et al. Developing a model for embedded palliative care in a cancer clinic. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. Vol. 07 (Issue 03) pp.247-250.

 

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Health Care Use by Older Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia at the End of Life

Little is known about the patterns and predictors of the use of end-of-life health care among patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) | Journal of Clinical Oncology

End-of-life care is particularly relevant for older adults with AML because of their poor prognosis.

We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study of patients with AML who were ≥ 66 years of age at diagnosis and diagnosed during the period from 1999 to 2011 and died before December 31, 2012. Medicare claims were used to assess patterns of hospice care and use of aggressive treatment. Predictors of these end points were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression analyses.

In the overall cohort (N = 13,156), hospice care after AML diagnosis increased from 31.3% in 1999 to 56.4% in 2012, but the increase was primarily driven by late hospice enrollment that occurred in the last 7 days of life. Among the 5,847 patients who enrolled in hospice, 47.4% and 28.8% started their first hospice enrollment in the last 7 and 3 days of life, respectively. Among patients who transferred in and out of hospice care, 62% received transfusions outside hospice. Additionally, the use of chemotherapy within the last 14 days of life increased from 7.7% in 1999 to 18.8% in 2012. Patients who were male and nonwhite were less likely to enroll in hospice and more likely to receive chemotherapy or be admitted to intensive care units at the end of life. Conversely, older patients were less likely to receive chemotherapy or have intensive care unit admission at the end of life, and were more likely to enroll in hospice.

End-of-life care for older patients with AML is suboptimal. Additional research is warranted to identify reasons for their low use of hospice services and strategies to enhance end-of-life care for these patients.

Full reference: Wang, R. et al. (2017) Health Care Use by Older Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia at the End of Life. Journal of Clinical Oncology. Published online: 7th August 2017

Transferring Palliative Care Inpatients to Residential Care

The survival of patients with advanced cancer, coupled with the increased presence of end-stage chronic illnesses in an aging population, is leading to a demand in palliative care | Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care

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Due to the ongoing need for acute-pain and symptom control in hospice/palliative care units, few are able to offer long-stay admission for those whose symptoms have stabilized. When a patient no longer requires specialist palliative care services, transfer from an inpatient palliative care facility may then be necessary. A core component of the role of palliative-care social workers involves working with patients and their families/carers when the care pathway shifts and the option of residential aged care facility (RACF) needs to be considered.

This research explored several issues, including the impact of this transition on the patient and their families and on the interdisciplinary health care team treating the patient. An investigation was undertaken to identify concerns and barriers regarding the transition from hospice care to RACF and opportunities were highlighted to improve clinical practice in this area. A tripartite approach was adopted conducting face-to-face interviews with patients, their families/carers, and health care professionals. Members of the interdisciplinary team were interviewed and social workers working in similar inpatient palliative-care facilities undertook telephone interviews to gauge their experiences. A thematic analysis discerned a number of themes highlighting the impact of this transition on key stakeholders and incorporated recommendations to improve or best manage this process.

The research has highlighted the difficulties that patients/families encounter in this transition, as well as the emphases of protecting the integrity of the patient and family. This is achieved by holding open and ongoing dialogue, particularly through family meetings and working in collaboration with the patient, the family, and the team. Understanding the experience and impact of this transition on key stakeholders is helpful in building up a knowledge base and to ensure a more effective relationship occurs. This research incorporated the voices of terminally ill patients, families, and members of the health care team in order to understand their views and recommendations for best managing the transition from a hospice/inpatient palliative-care facility to a RACF. This enables their input to have some real impetus in clinical practice and service delivery.

Full reference:  Kallianis, V. et al. (2017) “Unexpected and Distressing”: Understanding and Improving the Experience of Transferring Palliative Care Inpatients to Residential Care. Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care. Published online: 1 June 2017

Nurse-led intervention helps carers’ manage medication and cancer pain

The potential benefits of a new nurse-led intervention in supporting carers to manage pain medication in people with terminal cancer are explored in this article | ScienceDaily

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Image source: frankieleon – Flickr // CC BY 2.0

A study funded by Marie Curie and Dimbleby Cancer Care published today shows the potential benefits of a new nurse-led intervention in supporting carers to manage pain medication in people with terminal cancer. Researchers from the University of Southampton, Cardiff University and University of Leeds have developed a nurse-led intervention to help carers with medication management, and evaluated its use in routine practice.

The Cancer Carers’ Medicines Management (CCMM) intervention addresses carers’ beliefs, knowledge and skills and promotes self-evaluation of competence. It centres on a structured conversational process between a nurse and carer. It is the first time that a study has attempted to integrate an intervention developed using input from carers and nurses into routine palliative care. The research showed that the CCMM intervention compared favourably with current practice as it offered a more systematic and comprehensive approach to supporting carer management of pain medicines.

Prognostic Awareness Among Terminally Ill Cancer Patients in Their Last 6 Months of Life

Developing accurate prognostic awareness, a cornerstone of preference‐based end‐of‐life (EOL) care decision‐making, is a dynamic process involving more prognostic‐awareness states than knowing or not knowing | The Oncologist

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Understanding the transition probabilities and time spent in each prognostic‐awareness state can help clinicians identify trigger points for facilitating transitions toward accurate prognostic awareness. We examined transition probabilities in distinct prognostic‐awareness states between consecutive time points in 247 cancer patients’ last 6 months and estimated the time spent in each state.

Terminally ill cancer patients’ prognostic awareness generally remained unchanged, with a tendency to become more aware of their prognosis. Health care professionals should facilitate patients’ transitions toward accurate prognostic awareness in a timely manner to promote preference‐based EOL decisions.

Terminally ill Taiwanese cancer patients’ prognostic awareness generally remained stable, with a tendency toward developing higher states of awareness. Health care professionals should appropriately assess patients’ readiness for prognostic information and respect patients’ reluctance to confront their poor prognosis if they are not ready to know, but sensitively coach them to cultivate their accurate prognostic awareness, provide desired and understandable prognostic information for those who are ready to know, and give direct and honest prognostic information to clarify any misunderstandings for those with inaccurate awareness, thus ensuring that they develop accurate and realistic prognostic knowledge in time to make end‐of‐life care decisions.

Full reference: Hsiu Chen, C. et al. (2017) Transitions in Prognostic Awareness Among Terminally Ill Cancer Patients in Their Last 6 Months of Life Examined by Multi‐State Markov Modeling. The Oncologist. Published online before print: 6th July 2017.

Deaths from dementia set to quadruple by 2040

The number of people who will die from dementia could almost quadruple over the next 20 years, suggests a study published in BMC Medicine | Story via OnMedica

hospital-bed-315869_1280Researchers analysed mortality statistics for England and Wales from 2006 to 2014 to estimate the prevalence of palliative care need in the population.

By using explicit assumptions about change in disease prevalence over time and official mortality forecasts, they modelled palliative care need up to 2040 as well as making projections for dementia, cancer and organ failure.

They calculated that by 2040, annual deaths in England and Wales could rise by at least 25.4% from 501,424 in 2014 to 628,659 in 2040.  If age and sex-specific percentages with palliative care needs remained the same as in 2014, the number of people requiring palliative care could grow by 25% from 375,398 to 469,305 people a year.

However, if the upward trend observed from 2006 to 2014 continued, they said, the increase could be as much as 47% more people needing palliative care by 2040 in England and Wales.

In addition, disease-specific projections showed that dementia (increasing from 59,199 to 219,409 deaths/year by 2040) and cancer (increase from 143,638 to 208,636 deaths by 2040) would be the main drivers of the growing need.

The authors concluded: ‘Our analysis indicates that palliative care need will grow far more over the next 25 years than previously expected’.

Full reference: Etkind, S. N et al. How many people will need palliative care in 2040? Past trends, future projections and implications for services. BMC Medicine 2017 15:102.

Quality of life, psychological burden, unmet needs, and care satisfaction in family caregivers of advanced cancer patients

Anneke Ullrich et. al. Quality of life, psychological burden, needs, and satisfaction during specialized inpatient palliative care in family caregivers of advanced cancer patients BMC Palliative Care. Published online 10 May 2017.

Background

This pilot study aimed to investigate quality of life, psychological burden, unmet needs, and care satisfaction in family caregivers of advanced cancer patients (FCs) during specialized inpatient palliative care (SIPC) and to test feasibility and acceptance of the questionnaire survey.

Methods

During a period of 12 weeks, FCs were recruited consecutively within 72 h after the patient’s admission. They completed validated scales on several outcomes: quality of life (SF-8), distress (DT), anxiety (GAD-7), depression (PHQ-9), supportive needs (FIN), palliative care outcome (POS), and satisfaction with care (FAMCARE-2). We used non-parametric tests, t-tests and correlation analyses to address our research questions.

Results

FCs showed high study commitment: 74 FCs were asked to participate whereof 54 (73%) agreed and 51 (69%) returned the questionnaire. Except for “bodily pain”, FCs’ quality of life (SF-8) was impaired in all subscales. Most FCs (96%) reported clinically significant own distress (DT), with sadness, sorrows and exhaustion being the most distressing problems (80–83%). Moderate to severe anxiety (GAD-7) and depression (PHQ-9) were prevalent in 43% and 41% of FCs, respectively. FCs scored a mean number of 16.3 of 20 needs (FIN) as very or extremely important (SD 3.3), 20% of needs were unmet in >50% of FCs. The mean POS score assessed by FCs was 16.6 (SD 5.0) and satisfaction (FAMCARE-2) was high (73.4; SD 8.3).

Conclusions

This pilot study demonstrated feasibility of the questionnaire survey and showed relevant psychosocial burden and unmet needs in FCs during SIPC. However, FCs’ satisfaction with SIPC seemed to be high.

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