People who are dying should be asked about their spiritual beliefs

NICE has published new guidance calling on healthcare professionals to ask adults in the final days of life about their religious or spiritual beliefs.

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Cultural preferences and spiritual beliefs should be included in discussions about the care a person, and those close to them, want to receive, says NICE.

Knowing if someone holds a religious belief can be important for providing the care they desire. For example, someone who is Catholic may wish to receive the last prayers and ministrations.

The 2016 End of Life Care Audit reported nearly half of all deaths in England occurred in hospital. Spiritual wishes were only documented for one in 7 people who were able to communicate their desires.

Read the full overview here

Read the full guidance here

Spiritual care in palliative care influences patient-reported outcomes

van de Geer, J. et al. Palliative Medicine. Published online: November 9 2016

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Background: Spiritual care is reported to be important to palliative patients. There is an increasing need for education in spiritual care.

Aim: To measure the effects of a specific spiritual care training on patients’ reports of their perceived care and treatment.

Design: A pragmatic controlled trial conducted between February 2014 and March 2015.

Setting/participants: The intervention was a specific spiritual care training implemented by healthcare chaplains to eight multidisciplinary teams in six hospitals on regular wards in which patients resided in both curative and palliative trajectories. In total, 85 patients were included based on the Dutch translation of the Supportive and Palliative Care Indicators Tool. Data were collected in the intervention and control wards pre- and post-training using questionnaires on physical symptoms, spiritual distress, involvement and attitudes (Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List) and on the perceived focus of healthcare professionals on patients’ spiritual needs.

Results: All 85 patients had high scores on spiritual themes and involvement. Patients reported that attention to their spiritual needs was very important. We found a significant (p = 0.008) effect on healthcare professionals’ attention to patients’ spiritual and existential needs and a significant (p = 0.020) effect in favour of patients’ sleep. No effect on the spiritual distress of patients or their proxies was found.

Conclusion: The effects of spiritual care training can be measured using patient-reported outcomes and seemed to indicate a positive effect on the quality of care. Future research should focus on optimizing the spiritual care training to identify the most effective elements and developing strategies to ensure long-term positive effects.

Read the abstract here

Faith at the end of life: public health approach resource for professionals

Public Health England (PHE)

This resource aims to help frontline professionals and providers working in community settings and commissioners maintain a holistic approach to the people dying, caring or bereaved. It provides information to help ensure that commissioning and delivery of services and practice takes account of spiritual needs of the six largest faith groups in England and remains appropriate to the community setting in which they work.